Finding the Right People


Here are my thoughts for 23rd Sunday after Pentecost, 13 November 2011. I will be at the Van Cortlandtville Community Church in Cortlandt Manor, NY, next week (location of church). The service is at 10:30 and you are welcome to attend. The Scriptures for this Sunday are Judges 4: 1 – 7, 1 Thessalonians 5: 1 – 11, and Matthew 25: 14 – 30. 

This has been edited since it was first posted.

It is interesting that these three Scripture readings would come after the week in which elections were held. Because I see in the readings issues about leadership and the response of the people. I also see issues relevant to the church today (I was going to say modern church but there are times when the church today is simply a 21st century version of the Old Testament and one in which the New Testament has yet to be written).

Consider, if you will, the role of Deborah. We hear from many more conservative church leaders today that women should not be placed in roles of leadership, other than perhaps as Sunday School teachers (which would be a stereo-typical role of women as only teachers). But the Old Testament passage points out that Deborah was one of the judges of Israel, one of those chosen to lead the nation in times of war and peace.

Why did Deborah lead her people? Simply put, she had the skills and abilities and whoever wrote Judges must have been impressed enough with what she could do to include her leadership in the history of the people. Her leadership was predicated on her talents, not her gender. This is a point that I think is often overlooked in a reading of the Bible.

Now, I will be honest; when I read the parable of ten talents, today’s Gospel reading, I see it in a variety of terms. When you read the translation from The Message or Clarence Jordan’s Cotton Patch Gospels, it is read in terms of money. But one has to be careful, I think, in putting in terms of money because the idea of a five-fold or ten-fold return on your investment is the foundation of the prosperity gospel and I have no desire to go there.

And as someone asked me over the weekend, what would the master have done if either the individual given the five talents or ten talents had invested it in something speculative or risky? Would they have benefited in the same manner as they did with what one may assume were safe investments? Or would they have been chastised as the individual who took his one talent and hid it away so that it could not be lost?

I realize that there is a risk involved in many investments and I want to be assured of a reasonable return on my investment but I also know, especially in today’s society, that the thrill of a fantastic return on a small investment leads to many penalties. By the same token, if you have some skills or talents and you do nothing with them, then you have wasted those skills and talents. But if you use those skills and talents, you have the opportunity to go beyond your present limits.

I see the parable of the ten talents in that light, especially when you think about Deborah. You take the talents you have and you move beyond the limitations that are imposed on you by society. Deborah should not have been a leader of the Israelite nation but her talents and skills were better than any other possible candidate. I routinely point out to my chemistry classes that the first person to win two Nobel prizes was Marie Curie and both were awarded at a time when women were not exactly welcome in either chemistry or physics. But the work she did could not be overlooked and it is too the credit of the Nobel Prize Committee that she was given both awards.

The same is true for each one of us; we each have a unique set of talents and skills and what we do with those talents and skills that will determine the outcome of our life. As I read Paul’s words to the Thessalonians, I since an attitude that may have been shared by the individual who received the one talent. We have what we have and we need do nothing more; we can take it easy. But what will happen then?

The title of the message is “Finding the Right People”. It means that we must identify the skills and talents of each individual that we work with and we must determine how to best use those skills and talents. But we have to push the envelope when it comes to making that determination. For only by pushing the envelope (and my apologies for using that cliché) can we move forward.

The problem right now for the church is that we are afraid to move forward, afraid to use our talents and skills in ways that reflect the mission of the church, afraid to venture outside the safety of our sanctuary and church. We hold to worn-out views of the world, views that say only certain individuals are capable of leadership and others must follow them. We hold to views that say that there are only certain things that a church can do. We have to move beyond those views, look at what the churches of the past have done (and I mean the past, say two thousand years ago) and see how we can make that the church of the future.

Actually we don’t need to find the right people; we have them in the congregation today. We have to find out what their skills and talents are and we have to be able to use all of those skills and talents for the good of the community. It is not easy but doing the work of the Lord never is.

It means moving beyond, not holding back. The question has to be, “are you ready to do so?”

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