“A Particular Order of Things”


A Mediation for Trinity Sunday, June 15, 2014 (Year A)

The Scriptures for this Sunday are Genesis 1 – 2: 4, 2 Corinthians 13: 11 – 13, and Matthew 28: 16 – 20.

There is a certain degree of irony in the Scripture readings for this Sunday, at least for me. There is, of course, the Old Testament reading which I look at from one particular point of view and the Gospel reading for today and how I see it as well.

In another project that I am working on I write that believe that there are no three words that create more controversy in society today than the beginning words of Genesis, “In the beginning.” Intuitively, we know that there has to be beginning for everything, but for some reason, perhaps our own human frailties, we have a hard time understanding this.

It is very difficult to envision the creation of this planet and the life that exists, let alone the creation of the universe. In an increasingly complex and technologically oriented world, it seems far easier to accept the notion that God created the world and all that is here in a period of six days.

This is the view that we first learned in Sunday School and never adequately discussed in our science classes growing up. Perhaps it was not discussed because 1) it was too controversial and/or 2) it is a concept not easily demonstrated in the classroom as a demonstration or through experimentation. What we know from the development of the various science curricula in the 1960s was that understanding a rather abstract thought requires an approach that moves the student from a concrete viewpoint to an abstract viewpoint and this is not always easily done.

But we are by nature a curious creature, a creature created in the image of the same God that created this world and this universe. It is our curiosity that seeks to understand this world and this universe. To not ask questions about this world would be to deny our own creation.

Consider what Charles Handy said,

Learning is discovery but discovery doesn’t happen unless you are looking. Necessity may be the mother of invention but curiosity is the mother of discovery.” (The Age of Unreason , 1990)

We can only begin to imagine what the author of Genesis might have been thinking when he or she recorded the words that chronicle the beginning of the universe and this world. I learned this morning of a possible theological reason but I don’t think it affects the scenario that follows.

Perhaps it was the end of the day and families were gathered around the fire. One of the children in the group may have very well asked one of the elders how it was that they had gotten to that moment in time and space. And the elder may very well have responded, “In the beginning” and the lesson began.

It was a story told from the heart as well as the mind and it reflected the knowledge and understanding of the world at that time. It was as much a story of how a group of individuals came to be and was an explanation of their relationship with God as much as with this world. That story, how we came to be a group of individuals in a relationship with God, is still a valid story today, some three thousand years later, and one which needs to be retold time and time again.

But to tell the story as it was told three thousand years ago would 1) effectively deny who we are, 2) deny the relationship that we have with God, 3) ignore all that we have come to know about this planet and this universe, and 4) turn a living story in pages in a dry and dusty old book.

Now, I recall reading or hearing somewhere that the order of creation outlined in the first part of Genesis mirrors the order of creation from the “Big Bang” to life today. And I have to wonder about that. I do not wonder if the elder who told the story some three thousand years ago had some magically insight into what took place,

Rather, it would seem that this elder took some time to think things through and place things in the most logical order. After all, you can’t have living things appearing on the planet before there was plants and things to eat. And you can’t have the plants appear before the land is established. And where the water and the air come from? So the story was laid out in a logical manner in the minds of the story tellers.

If this were the case, as I would think it had to be, then why is it that we don’t want to think today? Why is it that we are quite willing to let others think for us? As I see the world around us today, I see us going away from exploration and questioning and moving towards a state of inflexibility and closed minds.

We are not interested in what is around the corner, we do not care if there is life on other planets, and we are not prepared to answer questions that have not been asked because we do not teach curiosity and inquiry in our schools today. We want our students to memorize things without questioning what it is they are memorizing.

Don’t get me wrong, memorization is a very valid skill but it is 2nd on the list of learning skills with analysis and other higher level thinking skills coming after that. You cannot simply stop at memorization; you must move upward if you expect new things to be created.

Creativity is a natural part of learning but it cannot be learned if it is not put into place. And when someone says to me that we are not to question things, such as the Bible, I have to wonder what their individual goal or thought process might be.

And that leads me to the Gospel reading for today. The passage from Matthew is often called the “Great Commission”, the challenge to bring people to Christ. In some translations, the challenge is to make disciples but The Message translates those words as “train everyone” and “instruct them in all that I have commanded you.” Clarence Jordan, in his Cotton Patch Gospels, says to make students and teach them.

You cannot do that if you beat them over the head with the message, which is how I have seen people interpret the command to make disciples of all the people. If you are not going to show me what it is that you want me to do, if you are going to tell me that this is the way that I have to do then 1) I am not likely to listen and 2) I will not be interested in the outcome.

Were it not for my own curiosity, I might have walked away from the church some fifty years ago and never looked back.

But my story is a little different; I came to Christ on my own and in answer to His call. Not everyone is like that, though they will come on their own. How then do we teach them? How then do we train them?

And this brings forth the 2nd irony of this weekend. I just completed an on-line course in finding one’s spiritual gifts. I learned a couple of things; first, my present gifts are not what I thought they would be and second, I became convinced that knowing one’s spiritual gifts are important and necessary to the direction and mission of the local church.

If you have no idea what your gifts are, it becomes a little hard to do the things that you need to be doing if you don’t know if you can do them. And then we consider Paul’s words to the Corinthians as to how things are done.

So, today we have been charged and challenged to take the Word out into the world. We have been charged and challenged to do so in a way that expresses the love of God for all of his children, children born on this world that He created.

Just as there was only one order to the way the world can be created, there is only one order in which we can bring the world to God, through Christ and with love.

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