2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 13


These are the responses of the 2016 Presidential candidates to the fourth of the twenty questions posed to them earlier.

I posted the responses to Question #1 at (concerning innovation) at “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 1”.

The responses to Question #2 (concerning research) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 2″.

The responses to Question #3 (concerning climate change) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 3″.

The responses to Question #4 (concerning biodiversity) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 4″.

The responses to Question #5 (concerning the Internet) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 5″.

The responses to Question #6 (concerning mental health) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 6″.

The responses to Question #7 (concerning energy) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 7″.

The responses to Question #8 (concerning science and mathematics education) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 8″.

The responses to Question #9 (concerning public health) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 9″.

The responses to Question #10 (concerning water) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 10″.

The responses to Question #11 (concerning nuclear energy) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 11″.

The responses to Question #12 (concerning food) are at  “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health -& Environmental Questions – Question 12″.

  • Global Challenges

We now live in a global economy with a large and growing human population. These factors create economic, public health, and environmental challenges that do not respect national borders. How would your administration balance national interests with global cooperation when tackling threats made clear by science, such as pandemic diseases and climate change, that cross national borders?

Hillary Clinton (D)

Many of the greatest – and hardest – challenges facing our country extend beyond our borders and can only be ultimately addressed through global solutions. Climate change is a case in point. And that is why as Secretary of State I elevated the role of climate policy in our diplomacy, appointing our country’s first Special Envoy for Climate Change, making climate policy a key part of our broader relationship with China and other key countries, and helping to create and launch the global Climate and Clean Air Coalition to reduce potent non-carbon climate pollution.

As the world’s biggest and most powerful economy—and as the second-biggest emitter of greenhouse gases and the biggest historical emitter—the United States has a responsibility to lead the global response to the climate challenge. By making strong progress to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at home, President Obama was able to persuade and pressure other major emitters, including China and India, to step up. This dual process, where domestic policy changes helped spur international action, led to the historic 195-nation Paris climate agreement, the first in our history where every country agreed to be part of the solution to climate change.

The Paris agreement is critical, but it is not sufficient on its own. To keep global warming below the two degrees’ Celsius threshold and avoid the worst consequences of climate change, we need to cut emissions by at least 80 percent below 2005 levels by mid-century. To get there, we will need to continually work to improve upon the goals set in Paris, both in the United States and around the world. That’s why we must work to support more clean energy investment in emerging economies, help developing nations build resilience to the climate impacts that can’t be avoided, and continue to drive clean energy innovation here at home. And we will continue to work on a bilateral and multilateral basis with our partners, with key countries like China, and with the UNFCCC to protect our nation, our planet, and our children’s future.

When dealing with the outbreak of diseases, we must be sure to act with caution, and rely on science to inform our decisions around trade, travel, and treatment. We are privileged to live in a country that individuals around the world aspire to visit and even immigrate to. It is within our national interest to think beyond our borders, and through our leadership, do everything we can to foster peace, health, and security around the world. In the United States, we need to break the cycle in which our own public health system is beholden to emergency appropriations for specific epidemics. We can do this by creating a dedicated Rapid Response Fund to help shore up our defenses, accelerate development of vaccines and new treatments, and respond more effectively to crises. We will also create a comprehensive global health strategy that moves beyond the disease-by-disease emergency model and seeks to build a robust, resilient global health system capable of quickly responding to and ending pandemics.

Donald Trump (R)

Our best input to helping with global issues is to make sure that the United States is on the proper trajectory economically. For the past decade we have seen Gross Domestic Product growth that has not provided adequate resources to fix our infrastructure, recapitalize our military, invest in our education system or secure energy independence. We cannot take our place as world leader if we are not healthy enough to take care of ourselves. This means we must make sure that we achieve our goals in tax reform, trade reform, immigration reform and energy independence. A prosperous America is a much better partner in tackling global problems that affect this nation achieving its national objectives.

Jill Stein (G)

We need a foreign policy based on diplomacy, international law and respect for human rights. By strengthening international institutions, we lay the groundwork for greater cooperation on critical challenges such as climate change and pandemic diseases.

My thoughts

Okay, this was Stein’s turn to give the proverbial non-answer answer.  Human rights are clearly a necessary part of any global policy but it is only part of it.  If this country or any country proceeds on a path that puts it above the needs of the world, it will come up short.

This is the problem with Trump’s answer.  It is one thing to invest in this country (and that is perhaps a necessity) but you cannot make economic policy the driving force for science policy.  And many corporations have shown an extreme disdain for the global impact of their work.

Clinton’s answer addresses the need for an understanding that, if you will, the flapping wings of a butterfly in California move the air in New York.  I do think that her approach, as her answers to earlier questions have shown, is more bureaucratic than practical.  I am of the opinion that the methodology is in place to solve the problems; we do not need additional committees and action groups.

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8 thoughts on “2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 13

  1. Pingback: 2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 14 | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

  2. Pingback: 2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 15 | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

  3. Pingback: 2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 16 | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

  4. Pingback: 2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 17 | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

  5. Pingback: 2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 18 | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

  6. Pingback: 2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 19 | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

  7. Pingback: 2016’s Top Presidential Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions – Question 20 | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

  8. Pingback: Mr. Trump’s Answers to Science, Engineering, Tech, Health & Environmental Questions | Thoughts From The Heart On The Left

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