“The Missing Ones”


Here are some thoughts for this coming Sunday (July 29, 2018, 10th Sunday after Pentecost – Year B).


One mark of a good leader is how he or she treats those they lead.  In the Old Testament reading for today, Uriah declines the offer for personal leave because the troops he is commanding would not get the same benefit.  It may be that the other Israelite commanders were of such a mind to leave the battlefield if the opportunity presented itself but that is something we do not know.

Even without being named, Uriah’s troops were a part of the narrative.  Now, we have all been taught that Jesus fed the multitudes not once but twice.  Still, the numbers that we are told were present only counted the men; any women or children that would have been there would not have been counted.  It was part of the culture of that time that women and children were considered “non-persons”, even though they were there.

The one thing that we know about Jesus’ mission was his desire to bring the missing, the forgotten, and the lost back to God.  It is still part of the mission today, even though there are many who would disagree.

How can we say that Christ’s mission is fulfilled, and the God’s Kingdom is at hand when there are people missing, forgotten, or cast aside?

~ Tony Mitchell

 

2 thoughts on ““The Missing Ones”

  1. Hi, Tony,

    “taught that Jesus feed the multitudes not once but twice” I think you might want to change feed to fed. I like this posting. I go on and on about inclusiveness…that despite the fact the our church logo says, “Open hearts, Open minds, Open doors,” we don’t do it very well. Some of the people who need us, the church, more are the very people we tend to exclude. Sad.

    • Thanks for catching that error (can’t say it was a typo because the word was correctly spelled). Let us hope that as we look at the world around us, we are reminded of what we are to do.

      Thanks again for reading and commenting.
      Dr. T

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